Over half of patients treated with selumetinib in phase I trial see reduction in plexiform neurofibromas.

New York, NY (PRWEB) June 08, 2015

As hundreds of the world’s leading NF experts convene in Monterey, California for the Children’s Tumor Foundation NF Conference, the largest gathering dedicated to neurofibromatosis (NF), it was announced today that for the first time in the history of the treatment of plexiform neurofibromas (PNs), over 50% of patients saw decreased volume in these inoperable tumors. In a presentation titled “The Promise of MEK: Therapeutics for NF1″, Brigitte C. Widemann, MD, of the National Cancer Institute (NCI), reported that response data in a phase I trial for children an Continue reading

Caught it in just the nick of time…mechanic told me I was running on just air!!! Damn! If it’s not one thing, it’s another. Pretty soon we’ll probably have to start thinking about checking the oil and rotating the battery.image

Reggie in CanadaThe NINDS supports clinical research aimed at understanding the natural history of tumors in NF2 and determining possible factors that may regulate their growth patterns. Using diagnostic imaging, eye examinations, hearing and balance tests, neurologic examinations, blood and genetic testing, and quality of life assessements, researchers hope to better characterize the impact of NF2 on individuals and look for possible factors that may affect disease progression.

Reggie at the Houston International FestivalThe NINDS is supporting ongoing research with a large group of children with NF1 to find associations between brain abnormalities and specific cognitive disabilities. Finding these links would give doctors an indication of the kinds of learning disabilities parents and their children could anticipate and help them develop early intervention programs.

Reggie and RieCurrent basic and clinical research is aimed at understanding how the genetic mutations that cause the benign tumors of NF1 also cause neurons and neural networks to form abnormally during fetal development, which later result in the learning disabilities and cognitive deficits of children with the disorder. The NINDS also encourages research to develop improved methods to diagnose the neurofibromatoses and identify factors that contribute to the wide variations of symptoms and severity of the disorders.

Reggie in DCOngoing NINDS-sponsored research continues to discover additional genes that appear to play a role in NF-related tumor suppression or growth. Continuing research on these genes and their proteins is beginning to reveal how this novel family of growth regulators controls tumors formation and growth. Understanding the molecular pathways and mechanisms that govern these key proteins and their activities will offer scientists exciting opportunities to design drugs that could replace the missing proteins in people who have the neurofibromatoses, and return their cell production to normal.

MD AndersonIn the mid-1990s, research supported by the NINDS located the exact position of the NF1 gene on chromosome 17. The gene has been cloned and its structure continues to be analyzed. The NF1 gene makes a large and complex protein called neurofibromin, which is primarily active in nervous system cells as a regulator of cell division and functions as a kind of molecular brake to keep cells from over-multiplying. In addition to work on NF1, intensive efforts have led to the identification of the NF2 gene on chromosome 22. As in NF1, the NF2 gene product is a tumor-suppressor protein (called merlin or schwannomin).

Reggie and MomThe National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), is the primary federal supporter of research on neurological diseases. The Institute sponsors basic studies aimed at understanding normal and abnormal development of the brain and nervous system, as well as clinical trials to improve the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disorders. In conjunction with the other NIH institutes, the NINDS supports research focused on finding better ways to prevent, treat, and ultimately cure the neurofibromatoses.

Reggie and PJClinical genetic testing can confirm the presence of a mutation in the NF1 gene. Prenatal testing for the NF1 mutation is also possible using amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling procedures. Genetic testing for the NF2 mutation is sometimes available, but is accurate only in about 65 percent of those individuals tested. Prenatal or genetic testing for schwannomotosis currently does not exist.

Reggie at the Houston Roller DerbyThere is no currently accepted medical treatment or drug for schwannomatosis, but surgical management is often effective. Pain usually subsides when tumors are removed completely, although it may recur should new tumors form. When surgery isn’t possible, ongoing monitoring and management of pain in a multidisciplinary pain clinic is advisable.